Something is going on with the primes…

The chart below illustrates the Erdős–Kac theorem. This relates to the number of distinct prime factors of large numbers (integer sequence A001221 in the On-Line Encyclopedia):

Number No. of prime factors No. of distinct prime factors
1 0 0
2 (prime) 1 1
3 (prime) 1 1
4 = 2×2 2 1
5 (prime) 1 1
6 = 2×3 2 2
7 (prime) 1 1
8 = 2×2×2 3 1
9 = 3×3 2 1
10 = 2×5 2 2
11 (prime) 1 1
12 = 2×2×3 3 2
13 (prime) 1 1
14 = 2×7 2 2
15 = 3×5 2 2
16 = 2×2×2×2 4 1

The Erdős–Kac theorem says that, for large numbers n, the number of distinct prime factors of numbers near n approaches a normal distribution with mean and variance log(log(n)), where the logarithms are to the base e. That seems to be saying that prime numbers are (in some sense) randomly distributed, which is very odd indeed.

In the chart, the observed mean of 3.32 is close to log(log(109)) = 3.03, although the observed variance of 1.36 is smaller. The sample in the chart includes 17 numbers with 8 distinct factors, including 1,000,081,530 = 2×3×3×5×7×19×29×43×67 (9 factors, 8 of which are distinct).

The Erdős–Kac theorem led to an episode where, following the death of Paul Erdős in 1996, Carl Pomerance spoke about the theorem at a conference session in honour of Erdős in 1997. Quoting Albert Einstein (“God does not play dice with the universe”), Pomerance went on to say that he would like to think that Erdős and [Mark] Kac replied “Maybe so, but something is going on with the primes.” The quote is now widely misattributed to Erdős himself.


Progress on prime pairs

One of the more famous unsolved questions of mathematics is the twin prime conjecture. There are many “twin prime” pairs of the form (p, p+2), where both p and p+2 are prime numbers. The pair (3, 5), for example. Or (5,7), (11,13), (17,19), (29,31), (10007,10009), or (10000139,10000141). The question is whether there are infinitely many such pairs.

A recent burst of work has seen progress towards answering this question, and a paper on arXiv.org by James Maynard (Centre de recherches mathématiques, Université de Montréal) reports that there are infinitely many pairs of primes separated by at most 600. See also the story in Wired. The underlying unsolved question might be cracked soon!