WSC: final Cruiser results

Based on the official results, the chart below (click to zoom) shows the final scores for the WSC Cruiser class. Each team has three coloured bars: first the number of person-kilometres, which should be large (black icons show occupied seats and white icons empty seats), then the energy usage, which should be small (number of charges, which is 6 in each case, times battery capacity), and finally the overall efficiency score, which should be large again (it is the ratio of those first two numbers). The rule for the efficiency score bar is: first bar divided by second bar, then scale so that the largest result is 80%. The scaled practicality scores out of 20 (grey bars) are then added. Eindhoven is the clear winner, with Bochum second.

The chart below (click to zoom) shows the raw practicality scores for all Cruisers (finishing, non-finishing, and non-starting).


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WSC: Challenger class charts

Based on data from the WSC web site, the final race chart above (click to zoom) shows Challenger-class timings (for the cars that did not trailer). It is drawn with reference to a baseline speed of 83.89 km/h. This is the speed that would complete the race (to “end of timing”) in 4 days and 5 hours. The left vertical axis shows how far behind the baseline cars are driving. Straight lines represent cars driving at a consistent speed. The right vertical axis shows arrival time at “end of timing” in Darwin time (Adelaide time is an hour later). The twists and turns of the lines here reveal many of the dramatic events of the race, such as the spate of bad weather. The chart below shows average speeds.


WSC: A quick chart

The chart above (click to zoom) is another of my classic race charts for this year’s race. Five Challengers have arrived, and two more are expected tomorrow afternoon. The chart is drawn with reference to a baseline speed of 83.89 km/h. This is the speed that would complete the race (to end of timing) in 4 days and 5 hours (that’s a substantially slower baseline than I used in 2015). The vertical axis shows how far behind the baseline cars are driving. Straight lines represent cars driving at a consistent speed. The right vertical axis shows arrival time at “end of timing” in Darwin time (Adelaide time is an hour later). Open coloured circles show simplistically extrapolated arrival times.

Update Friday: Aachen (70) still seems to be in the race. Guestimates for Cruiser arrival times are given as coloured squares. Unfortunately the WSC web site is misbehaving again, so there are no reliable control stop times for today.


WSC: Challenger and Cruiser charts

Based on data from the WSC web site, the chart above (click to zoom) shows Challenger-class timings. It is drawn with reference to a baseline speed of 83.89 km/h. This is the speed that would complete the race (to “end of timing”) in 4 days and 5 hours (that’s a substantially slower baseline than I used in 2015). The left vertical axis shows how far behind the baseline cars are driving. Straight lines represent cars driving at a consistent speed. The right vertical axis shows arrival time at “end of timing” in Darwin time (Adelaide time is an hour later).

Open coloured circles show simplistically extrapolated arrival times. For example, I would expect Nuon to arrive a little after 2 pm Darwin time (3 pm Adelaide time) tomorrow. The rest of the top five should arrive later in the afternoon, or early Friday morning. All the other Challengers are potentially in trouble, but it’s impossible to say for certain.

The grey stripe on the right (11:00 to 2:00 on Friday) shows the permitted Cruiser class arrival window. Eindhoven (40) and Bochum (11) are on track to arrive inside this window. Arrow (30) and HK IVE (35) will do so if they speed up a little. Minnesota (94) and Apollo (95), travelling at 60 km/h and 58 km/h respectively, are in serious trouble, timewise.

The chart above (click to zoom) shows Cruiser scores as at Kulgera (which lets us compare apples with apples). Each team has three coloured bars: first the number of person-kilometres, which should be large (black icons show occupied seats and white icons empty seats), then the energy usage, which should be small (number of charges, which is 4, times battery capacity), and finally the overall score, which should be large again (it is the ratio of those first two numbers). The black number inside the final bar shows the ranking. All bars are scaled to a percentage of the maximum, because the exact numbers do not matter – only the relative relationships. The rule for the final score bar is: first bar divided by second bar, then scale so that the largest result is 80%. The practicality score (out of 20) will be added to that final result.


WSC: Challenger update

There’s been a bit of confusion on the WSC web site, with Stanford and Goko being taken off the Challenger list and then put back on. The race chart below (click to zoom) hopefully sheds some light on the current status. It is drawn with reference to a baseline speed of 83.89 km/h. This is the speed that would complete the race (to “end of timing”) in 4 days and 5 hours (that’s a substantially slower baseline than I used in 2015). The left vertical axis shows how far behind the baseline cars are driving. Straight lines represent cars driving at a consistent speed. The right vertical axis shows arrival time at “end of timing” in Darwin time. Notice that Nuon’s clever weather strategy has allowed them to speed up substantially.


WSC: The Cruisers

The chart below (click to zoom) shows my estimated current state of play for the WSC Cruiser class. It combines person-kilometre data from the official website for Alice Springs, with the assumption that all teams recharged last night.

Each team has three coloured bars: first the number of person-kilometres, which should be large (black icons show occupied seats and white icons empty seats), then the energy usage, which should be small (number of charges, which is 4, times battery capacity), and finally the overall score, which should be large again (it is the ratio of those first two numbers). The black number inside the final bar shows the ranking. All bars are scaled to a percentage of the maximum, because the exact numbers do not matter – only the relative relationships. The rule for the final score bar is: first bar divided by second bar, then scale so that the largest result is 80%. The practicality score (out of 20) will be added to that final result.

It can be seen that Eindhoven has a solid lead. Minnesota is in second place, but Bochum is regaining lost ground. Of course, any teams that do not make it to Adelaide by the required time are out of the race. Minnesota and Apollo might have problems there.


WSC: Challenger race chart

The chart above (click to zoom) is the first of my classic race charts for this year’s race (a number of data issues have held me up). The chart, which only shows the 15 surviving Challengers, is drawn with reference to a baseline speed of 83.89 km/h. This is the speed that would complete the race (to end of timing) in 4 days and 5 hours (that’s a substantially slower baseline than I used in 2015). The vertical axis shows how far behind the baseline cars are driving. Straight lines represent cars driving at a consistent speed. There are several things to note here:

  • 3: Nuon: Nuon have engaged in superb weather strategy, which they describe here. They have sped up and slowed down to catch the sun.
  • 10: Tokai: Tokai slowed down substantially after Barrow Creek. They posted on Facebook that they were happy about being second into Alice Springs, but gave no explanation for their slower speed.
  • 15 & 88: WSU & Kogakuin: These two teams are running together. Both have slowed since Tennant Creek, and neither has explained why.
  • 25: Nagoya (NIT): This team also slowed after Tennant Creek, without explaining why.
  • 71: ITU: The “Bees On Wheels” are running absolutely borderline in terms of finishing the race on time. Even a small amount of bad luck could see them drop back to Adventure class.