American Solar Challenge Construction Progress

As I watch the lead-up to the American Solar Challenge next July, the chart above (click to zoom) shows the teams currently registered, with my estimate of current construction progress (based on a combination of social media reports and official paperwork). Team colours in the chart are my best guess in some cases. The University of Minnesota (Team 35) is in the lead (with an existing car and with most of the race paperwork done). Among teams building new cars, Italian team Onda Solare (559) and Canadian team Poly Montreal (55) lead the pack.

My ASC race information page will be updated from time to time with information on the progress of these and all the other teams. It also decodes the team numbers.


Render of Esteban9, the solar car being built by Polytechnique Montréal (picture credit)


Advertisements

Famous radiation leaks

The chart above shows approximate radiation releases (in becquerels) for some major nuclear disasters. It should be interpreted with caution, since some radioisotopes are more dangerous than others. For example, the releases from Three Mile Island were largely noble gases (mostly xenon), and that incident appears to have had few detectable environmental or health effects. Ticks on the vertical axis of the chart go up logarithmically, in steps of ×1000. For comparison, radium and bananas are also listed.


Chernobyl reactor #4 in 2007, encased in concrete


Religion in the Australian Census

Following up on my earlier post, here is a chart of religion in Australia, by age (as per the 2016 Census, with percentages on the vertical axis relating to the population of Australia as a whole, and excluding people with no religion specified). Coloured areas in this chart indicate the total number of people for each religious group:

The changing religious landscape is revealed by the variation with age. For people aged 65, the population is 25% Catholic, 24% secular, 22% Anglican, 16% other Christian, 7% Uniting Church, 2% Buddhist, 1% other religion, 1% Muslim, and 1% Hindu.

For people aged 25, it’s 47% secular, 21% Catholic, 11% other Christian, 8% Anglican, 4% Muslim, 3% Hindu, 3% Buddhist, 2% Uniting Church, and 2% other religion. The chart below shows these relative percentages, for each age cohort.

Immigration and children are keeping the Catholic Church stable in size, but the Uniting Church is in collapse, and the Anglican Church is not doing much better (other data suggests that it’s in collapse outside of Sydney). The “big three” non-Christian religions (Islam, Hinduism, and Buddhism) are more than 10% of the age-25 demographic. The chart also shows the impact of student-driven Indian immigration to Australia over the past decade or so – there is a visible peak for Hinduism around age 33.

There seems to be something odd about the religion given for young children up to age 13 or so – some parents (especially Catholics) seem to be listing young children as “no religion.” This might reflect delayed baptism. However, it also seems that many children lose their childhood religion in late teens and early adulthood.

Mean ages for adults within the different groups are Hindu: 37.1, Muslim: 37.7, secular: 42, other religion: 42.6, Buddhist: 43.5, Catholic: 48.6, other Christian: 50.4, Anglican: 54.8, and Uniting Church: 55.8. The last two groups in particular are skewed towards older people.


American Solar Challenge: 6 months to go

Scrutineering for the 2018 American Solar Challenge starts on July 6. The chart below summarises the 39 solar car teams from 8 countries which have registered for the race. Many of them are frantically building or modifying cars – see my race information page. The race will run through the mountains from Omaha, Nebraska to Bend, Oregon. Follow the leadup to the race here and on the official ASC Facebook at  


Colours in national flags

The infographic above shows the most common colour in various national flags, excluding white and black. For example, red is the most common colour in the US flag. If there are two or more equally common colours (as in BE = Belgium or FR = France), the country is given partial credit for both. Similar colours are grouped using k-means clustering in R.

Overall, shades of red seem the most popular, followed by shades of blue. The set of flag image files I analysed wasn’t fantastic, however, and that may have skewed the results slightly.


Democracy, Religion, and Same-Sex Marriage in Australia

The results of the postal survey are in, and Australia has voted 61.6% “Yes” to same-sex marriage. Or rather, it seems that two Australias voted. The official results have been made available by electorate, which means that they can be correlated with demographic factors (and my readers know that I love doing that). The average age of each electorate had no effect, but religious composition certainly did.

According to the 2016 census, Australia’s stated religious composition looks like this (where the 33.3% “Secular” includes Agnostic, Atheist, Humanist, New Age, and Unitarian Universalist):

The chart below shows a strong correlation (0.82) between the percentage of “Secular” people in an electorate, and the size of the “Yes” vote. If all the “Secular” people voted “Yes” (as seems likely), this means that 58% of the religious people voted “No.” Doing some simple multiple linear regression, there was a statistically significant link between religion and voting “No” for every major religious group. This link was strongest for Muslims, Hindus, Buddhists, Orthodox, the Uniting Church, and other non-Anglican Protestants. It was a little weaker for Anglicans and even more for Catholics, although the Anglican link was quite strong in Victoria, South Australia, New South Wales, and Queensland. The Catholic link was quite strong in the last three of those states.

Electorates in the chart are coloured according to the largest religious group within them. Sydney is 52.7% Secular, for example (as well as 8.6% Buddhist, 1.7% Muslim, 1.7% Hindu, 1% Jewish, 17.9% Catholic, 2.4% Orthodox, 13.5% Protestant, and 0.5% Other Religion). It voted 83.7% “Yes.”

Blaxland is 32.2% Muslim (as well as 9% Buddhist, 3.3% Hindu, 21.2% Catholic, 5.5% Orthodox, 13.2% Protestant, 0.7% Other Religion, and 14.9% Secular). It voted 73.9% “No.”

McMahon is 39% Catholic (as well as 5.9% Buddhist, 12.4% Muslim, 2.9% Hindu, 6.9% Orthodox, 18.5% Protestant, 1.4% Other Religion, and 13.2% Secular). It voted 64.9% “No.”

Barton is multi-religious with 28.1% Secular being the largest group (as well as 5.6% Buddhist, 8.4% Islam, 5.6% Hindu, 0.2% Jewish, 22.6% Catholic, 15.7% Orthodox, 13.3% Protestant, and 0.5% Other Religion). It voted 56.4% “No.”

It does seem that there is a secular Australia, which voted overwhelmingly “Yes,” and a religious Australia of twice the size, which voted mostly “No.” If the disparate religious communities in Australia realise that they have more in common than they have thought, that could have quite a significant influence on Australian politics in the future.


A (distorted) geographical view of the postal survey results