CIRCOS and networks

In an earlier post, I highlighted a nice visualisation of career paths, produced by Satyan Devados using the CIRCOS tool (which has its origins in genetic visualisation). As an experiment, here is a similar diagram I produced for the Southern Women Data Set. This famous dataset (originally from this book) links a somewhat divided community of 18 women to 14 events which they organised (click on the picture for a larger image):

It’s very pretty, but is it more or less informative than a traditional network diagram? What do you think?

Cubic symmetric graphs again

Continuing the theme of the Foster Census of cubic symmetric graphs (networks) from my last post, here is the graph F96B from that census (click on the picture for a larger image). This beautifully symmetrical graph has 96 nodes (all equivalent) and 144 edges (also all equivalent). The image does not do justice to the symmetry of this graph.

Graph F96B is bipartite: the two classes of node are coloured red and blue. It has diameter 7 and girth 8. One of the 8-rings within the graph is highlighted in orange. The graph can be expressed in LCF notation as [−45, −33, −15, 45, −39, −21, −45, 39, 21, 45, −15, 15, −45, 39, −39, 45, 33, 27, −45, 15, −27, 45, −39, 39]4.

Career paths visualised

From the wonderful Information is Beautiful Awards website, here is an interesting visualisation of careers chosen by 15,600 alumni of Williams College (right half of circle), given their majors (left half of circle). There is some aggregation here – “Cultural Studies” includes Anthropology, Sociology, and Asian Studies, for example. The visualisation was produced by Satyan Devados, and an interactive collection of subset images is also available here.