ASC 16: Tires


Tire on Bochum’s 2017 car (photo: Anthony Dekker)

In response to my Challenger strategy post, someone asked “what about tires?”

Yes, the rolling resistance of tires is a factor with solar cars. As tires rotate, the rubber in them flexes, and some energy gets lost this way. For a top Challenger class car, with good tires, about 85% of the solar energy is lost through aerodynamic drag, and about 15% through tires. That’s why my simple car model considered only aerodynamic drag.

The force required to overcome rolling resistance is g = 9.8 times the weight of the car times a tire-specific coefficient (ranging from 0.002 for an expensive solar car tire to 0.01 for a typical car tire). For a top Challenger class car, car and driver together will weigh around 250 kg. For a four-person Cruiser, it’s more like 800 kg – about triple. Bearing in mind that Cruisers often have tires with a higher coefficient of rolling resistance, this means that rolling resistance becomes quite significant with Cruisers. That is why Cruisers will sometimes turf out passengers to cut their energy use – even when running on a flat road. Climbing the mountains, overcoming gravity will come into play, and that uses up even more energy.


In ASC race news, I have updated my information page and teams list with news about day 1 of scrutineering.


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ASC 15: Scrutineering

In a few hours scrutineering for the American Solar Challenge begins. So here is an explanatory infographic to clarify what is being checked for each team. Official results will appear here, but I will also add them to my teams list.